About Malaga, Your Travel Guide
April 18, 2014 Malaga Guide HOME Recommend Us

Presentation


Harbor and Bullring, Malaga

Malaga is the capital city of the Costa del Sol and its international airport provides the gateway to all of the other Andalusian towns. Malaga airport is one of the largest in Spain and in a typical year can welcome up to 10 million visitors. Malaga also serves as a major port and an industrial centre for Southern Spain. Entrance to and exit from Malaga is made easy by the N340 highway and the coastal rail service. There is a wonderful Three Kings Festival in Malaga each year at the beginning of January, so if you're visiting during this time don't forget to take the kids along.
Malaga is a city steeped in more than 3,000 years of history. Excavations have discovered evidence of the Carthaginians, the Romans and the Moors. As a result, there is a large selection of historical monuments in this city. Malaga's cathedral is known as La Manquita, meaning “the little one armed lady. Due to the length of time, which it took to build the cathedral, it denotes Renaissance, Baroque and Neo-classical styles.
Close to Malaga cathedral is the Alcazaba, which is a fifteenth century Moorish fort and is one of the most important in the area. The roof of the Alcazabar offers panoramic views of Malaga city and the port. Further on from the Alcazabar is Malaga's Castle, which stands on Monte de Gibralfaro. At the foot of the hill, Malaga's ayuntamiento (town hall) is located, next to the city's museum in the Palacio de la Aduana. In fact, Malaga has so much to offer as a result of its history, that the best way to see it is by open top bus and there are many in the city.
Malaga is also well worth a visit during one of its many festivals. The Fiestas here are numerous and each one is celebrated with the vigour that is synonymous with Andalucia. The main Fiesta is the Feria, which takes place in the middle of August.